You can always use another purse

Yes you can. You know you have this weakness for a cute purse. They are fabulous accessories and you have to have different styles and colors to go with your wardrobe. What? Did I hear you say that your wardrobe is bland and one purse or pocketbook or bag goes with everything? Well that’s a topic for a different blogger. I am here to show you how you can spiff up your presentation with a lovely variety of purses.

I have a new pattern for a Pocket Clutch that is soooo cute I am in love with it. DSC00593It is based on my Fat Bottom bag, not so fat bottomed, and has a zippered pocket on the outside. Same zip across the top. Added a lovely detachable wrist strap. And it’s easy to make. Here’s another one where I did some quick machine fancy stitching on the solid brown to add some pizzazz.

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Here is another black beauty (to go with everything in the winter)!DSC00523

Very cute, right??

You can get a pattern for this adorable clutch on Craftsy.Craftsy.com

That’s right. For a mere pittance you can download the pattern and make one today (or tomorrow if you’re busy).

Go here to look at the pattern.

And I wish you a very Happy New Year, filled with sewing and happy projects, and purses.

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It’s Left-over Night!

I used to like left-over night when I was young. Mom would heat up everything left over from a few days of meals and we could *usually* each have something we liked especially or a little of everything. As a grown-up, 5 out of 7 nights are now reserved for left-overs in my house. 🙂 Mostly micro-cooking for me.

In my quilt world left-overs are saved for years. I don’t think of them as fabric scraps… scraps go in the trash. Left-overs will again bring color and sparkle to a quilt or other fabric project some day. I have accumulated a multitude of these pieces. I organized them in early January so that I could really see what I have and maybe used them more often. (instead of being in an overflowing large box on the floor). This is what it looks like now (and it takes up vertical space, which is better).

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The 5 boxes on the left are the batik pieces and the 6 boxes in the middle are the rest of the cottons. Specific colors are in each box. I’m sorry to say that the piles on the cabinet are the in-progress projects. I apparently like to start things and not finish them, ahem.

I started a new project with my scraps!!! I mean, I’m turning my left-overs into a new quilt!! I’ve been seeing lots of mention in blogland and by facebookers about the Scrappy Trip Around the World quilt. It looked very interesting and involved NO outlay of cash on my part to start it. The instructions are here. Bonnie Hunter at Quiltville makes it easy. She says to pick from all your scraps, anything goes. I wanted to use my blues cuz I have mostly them, and green goes great, and then there’s purple. And how ’bout some pink for sparkle. Another of my ‘design’ elements was a dark color that would go diagonally through the center, lending a strong criss-cross to the quilt. Some of my pieces didn’t qualify for this project because they were too small and couldn’t convert into  a strip easily.DSC00377

I had no problem tho, coming up with sufficient material and it still looks pretty full in the blue box. Easy-peasy, lemon squeezy, there’s a block or four.DSC00379

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I made another 2 after taking these pix. Fun! I am shooting for at least 12 blocks. I’ll see what it looks like when I get that far. What do you think??

Easy Peasy Eyeglasses Case

I looked around online for an easy eyeglasses case to make with scraps. Tried a few things and then came up with this that I really like. Sharing time! Here is a free tutorial so you can make your own…

HOW TO MAKE AN EASY PEASY EYEGLASSES CASE

1.Cut 2 fabrics (outer and lining) and one piece of batting (I like warm and white cotton) to 5.5″ x 7″. Make it 6″x7″ for sunglasses or large frames. If you have very small glasses, cut it 5″x6″. It should be tight enough so the glasses don’t easily fall out.

2. Layer them like a quilt and match the edges: lining face down, batting, and outer facing up.

3. Cut a curve from the middle top to the right edge about 1/3 down the side. Cut a small curve on the top left corner.

4. Move the lining to the top so that the right sides of the fabrics are facing each other.

5. Tip: cut the bottom corners off the batting. This will make the piece easier to turn out and to sew over.

6. Sew around the edge with a 1/4″ seam leaving 2 inches open at the bottom for turning. Clip off the corners close to the stitching.

7. Turn right side out, batting should stay inside. Carefully push out the curves and the corners.

8. Press flat and press in the seam allowance on the open space.

9. Quilt as desired. Simple diagonal lines work well. Or, don’t quilt it at all!

10. Fold the piece in half the long way and pin.

11. Using your machine’s walking foot and a decorative stitch, start at the top middle of the back and sew around the edge toward the joining of the front and back. Be careful to catch the folded over right edge and don’t let it scrunch up under the presser foot. Continue sewing all layers together and go around the bottom right corner and then the bottom of the case, closing the open space. Sew off the left folded egde and you are done. Easy peasy!

In a bind

 

Look at all the quilts I have in progress!!! 🙂  I make the binding after making the top and set it aside so that it will be all ready and waiting for when the quilt is quilted. There is a DIY on making binding on a separate page (the DIY page, believe it or not). Check it out!